Backcountry Bucket – Camp Water for Less Than an Ounce

Weight: 0.8 oz / 23g – PVC free – Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Folding Bucket – 10 L / 2.64 Gallon

I own this buck; a thing of beauty for ultralight backpacker. Unfold it, drip into the stream or river to fill with 2.64 gallons. I’ve used it for bath water and / or cooking water (of course you wouldn’t mix the two). And never dump your dirty water back in the stream. Packs down tiny.

Water Purification – The Katadyn BeFree™ Water Filtration System

Weight: 2.05 ounces. Right off, you know it’s going to be featherweight: perfect for ultralight backpacking. Katadyn Befree Water Filter With Hydrapak 0.6L Collapsible Flask

Here’s what Katadyn says about their filter: Winner of Backpacker Editors’ Choice Award, Runner’s World Gear of the Year Award, and ISPO Gold Awards! The lightweight and compact Katadyn BeFree water bottle and filter gives you the freedom to drink anytime, anywhere. With the BeFree™ Filter, you no longer have to worry about where your next drink will come from. Just fill up the flask and let the EZ-Clean Membrane™ do the work. Gently squeeze the flask for instant refreshment. Maintain the EZ-Clean Membrane™ quickly and easily for longer life and more enjoyment. Simply fill the flask with water, attach the cover and shake free the debris. Or, remove the filter from the flask and swish in any lake, river or stream. And when you’re ready to “hit the road,” the collapsible flask packs small to fit into tight spaces. Just Smash, Stash and Go! Worry less, Discover more, BeFree.

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.

Sea to Summit X-Set 11 Ultralight Camp Pot and Cups

At REI’s Portland Store — in my never-ending search for the newest and lightest backpacking equipment — I discovered the Sea to Summit collapsible pot and  cups. The set is just 11 ounces. I didn’t weigh the pot alone, but I’ll guess 5 ounces (142g) — a weight easily qualifying it to fit in any ultralight backpacking pack.

Sea to Summit X-Set 11 Sea to Summit X-Set 11 OpenBesides the weight, I was very impressed with its packability. From the Sea to Summit website:

“The innovative X-Kettle collapses to 1 3/8” (35mm) and has a 1-liter safe boiling capacity. A wide base absorbs maximum heat from the stove while protecting the silicone walls. Two glass-reinforced Nylon 66 handles support the upper rim and improve control when pouring. The two X-Mugs nest perfectly inside the Kettle to create an exceptionally compact cook system.”

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.

 

 

 

Snow Peak Gigapower Stove a Great Choice for Ultralight Backpacking

GigaPower Stove from Snow Peak on Vimeo.

Some extreme ultralight backpackers may think the Snow Peak Gigapower Stove, at 3.75 ounces (106 grams), is a brick. LOL. I think of it as a trail warrior worth a look.

This minimalist stove has been around for a long time, no doubt because it has proved its value and reliability. The Snow Peak Gigapower Stove is 4.2 inches long and 2.6 inches wide and is about as simple as they come.

Snow Peak offers a manual version (light with a match or other fire source) and an automatic version (which lights with the push of a button, no batteries required).

Boiling time with a canister of gas is just under 5 minutes. You get a lot of cooking time out of even the small canister.

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.

Bullet-Proof Alcohol Vargo Titanium Decagon Stove Just 1.2 Ounces

I was at REI today, looking at the latest and greatest ultralight backpacking equipment when I came across the Vargo Titanium Decagon Stove. I have tried just about every type of stove there is: Esbit, alcohol, propane and ethanol gel (but not biomass). I’ve made alcohol stoves out of soda cans and purchased the custom-made variety for a fortune.

Alcohol stoves are ultra light, but I found that by the time you carried the stove and a enough fuel to run it for several days, there is really no weight advantage over the fuel-canister-powered variety — assuming the stove itself is light. But that was 10 years ago and the “technology” seems to have advanced light years.

The Vargo Titanium weighs just 1.2 oz (34 grams) and takes 1.5 ounces of fuel. All one piece, the manufacturer boasts the ultralight backpacking Decagon Stove is so strong you can step on it with all your weight and it won’t break. In my hand, it did seem extremely strong and impossibly light.

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.

PCT Thru Hiker Red Beard Talks about Sawyer Mini and SteriPen Ultra

In my previous post, I discussed the Sawyer Mini Water Filter, at 2 ounces, a real challenge to big clunky water filters.

I use a SteriPen Adventurer, an ultralight version that weighs around 4 ounces. Two long-lasting batteries are required.

Today, however, I saw a review by someone who does some serious trail testing: PCT Thru Hiker Red Beard. He took the Sawyer Mini on his 2014 thru-hike and felt that it clogged too much to make it useful on long hikes.

This year, he was planning to take the SteriPen Ultra, 4.9 ounces. The SteriPen Ultra has no batteries and is rechargeable. Let’s hear from him about his pre-hike thoughts on the Ultra.

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.

Sawyer Mini Water Filter at 2 Oz. A Good Choice for Ultralight Backpacking

I had read about the Sawyer Mini Water Filter a couple of years ago, but had never seen a demonstration. I love the SteriPen Adventurer (3.8 ounces without the batteries; about 6 oz with) and have used it on many trips. Of course, it uses batteries. Although it is extremely reliable, you may still want to have a backup (pills). The Sawyer, with no batteries, looks like an interesting alternative.

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.

ZPacks Help Redefine “Ultralight Backpacking”

I started my backpacking days with a really beautiful, but giant 5800cu Dana Design Pack (7.5 pounds) stuffed full and weighing 40-45 pounds with food for just three days.

Feeling more like a pack mule than a backpacker, I saw the light when I read about the “Ray Way“.

Today, my basics (pack, pad, sleeping bag and tent) are around 9 pounds. With a few adjustments, I can go lighter. However, lighter translates into less comfort. For example, a 3/4 length mat can be thin and light at less than a pound, but can also be pretty uncomfortable and cold.

I feel pretty good about the lightness of my current Osprey Atmos 35 at 2.25 pounds. Still, ZPacks’ offerings at PCT Days in Cascade Locks, Oregon, which I attended a few weeks ago, go as low as 3.5 ounces for the small size “Zero Backpack” model. ZPacks rates the Zero Pack for loads of up to 20 pounds. They are not only light, but tough as well.

ZPacks is a home-grown business based in Florida. Founder Joe Valesko started ZPacks in 2005. Joe told me that he designs and tests all the gear, and has thru-hiked over 9,700 long distance miles including the Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail, Continental Divide Trail, Te Araroa Trail, TGOC Scotland, and the TMB in the Alps. You can see some of Joe’s Adventures Here.

Joe and his team also make ultralight tents and other gear.

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.

Let There Be Light … On the Trail and in the Tent

I recently attended a presentation about Luci, a “solar justice” solution for those who live in “energy poverty” (they have little or no electricity for basic living).
Created by Mpowerd, Luci lights are inflatable, waterproof, solar-powered lanterns that recharge indoors or out and will reportedly last for 12 hours of continuous use. They stay charged for months when not in use. 

 

 

The best part: they weigh just 2.5 ounces (about 70 grams) and fold flat to about a half inch by about 5 inches.

As a ultralight backpacker, I couldn’t resist buying one. It solves the problem of carrying batteries, especially on extended backpacks.

Be light. Be safe. Be one with the pack.